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Bus 210 Week 8 Developing Good Business Sense Essay

Creating a SWOT analysis of a company allows users to identify potential strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. It also allows the users to identify whether a business plan is viable or not. A SWOT analysis of the coffee distribution business plan yielded much information that both the owners and potential investors can use. It shows that the business has much strength. It also shows potential weaknesses. It also reveals the potential opportunities of the company as well as outside threats that the company may encounter. It is my belief that the coffee distribution business plan reveals a viable opportunity that will allow this business to grow and remain ahead of its competitors. Strengths The Coffee Warehouse intends to take advantage of the current market for suppliers of coffee distributors by providing the only full service distributor in the Spokane/Northern Idaho region. Currently no other distributor provides paper supplies or beverage cup systems. This will allow potential customers the opportunity to work with one vendor to obtain supplies as compared to the current system of using multiple vendors. The owners, Steve and Jennifer Smith, have over 20 years of combined experience in distribution and sales management. Jennifer Smith also has a strong background in graphic design, customer service, and office

Course Schedules

Course Descriptions

Accounting

ACT 101   Applied Accounting (3)

Introduces the accounting cycle. Basic concepts covered include double-entry bookkeeping and examination of basic financial reports such as the balance sheet, statement of owner's equity and income statement. Emphasis on cash receipts, cash disbursements, accounts receivable and accounts payable. Some assignments made using general ledger accounting software. Intended to be the first accounting course for students who have not taken high school accounting or have no accounting experience.

Course Type(s):

ACT 105   Personal Accounting and Finance (3)

Overview of practical business procedures, covering banking procedures (ATM, statements), investment matters, budgeting, insurance, payroll and associated taxes, interest, marketing and other economic issues, and other areas important to economic survival in a highly sophisticated business environment.

Course Type(s):

ACT 110   Financial Accounting I (4)

Prerequisites: ACT 101 or high school accounting strongly recommended

Introduction to financial accounting, through the theory and logic underlying accounting procedures as well as the measurement and presentation of financial data. Brief review of the basic accounting cycle. Development of fundamental concepts in determination of income and presentation of financial position of business firms. Exposure to partnership accounting as well as coverage of corporation accounting including stocks, stockholder equity transactions, and bonds. Introduction to international accounting as well as statement of cash flows.

Course Type(s):

ACT 115   Computerized Accounting I (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 101 or ACT 110 or successful completion of high school accounting or departmental approval.

Exposure to some of the most popular accounting software used in the marketplace by small and medium sized businesses. Computer application packages include Quickbooks, Peachtree, and Microsoft Excel. For students continuing their accounting/ business education or who want more knowledge in computerized accounting applications.

Course Type(s):

ACT 130   Managerial Accounting (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 110

Introduction to relevant costs for decision making, controlling, contribution approach to decision-making, and absorption costing versus direct costing effect on income. Coverage of segment profitability, budgeting, capital projects, selection and subsequent evaluation, cost volume and allocation involving joint costs decentralization, and performance measurement and transfer pricing. Emphasis on performance standards, activity-based costing, variance analysis, and responsibility accounting.

Course Type(s):

ACT 198   Accounting Internship (1-3 hrs)

Prerequisites: Requires prior approval of department chair or dean.

Students placed in a position or in business to gain practical experience and learn specific operational technologies.

Course Type(s):

ACT 210   Intermediate Accounting I (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 120 or ACT 130.

Accounting theory and practice related to the acquisition, use and disposal of fixed and intangible assets. Recognition and measurement of current assets including cash and inventories are covered. Includes comprehensive study of financial statements. Spring.

Course Type(s):

ACT 220   Intermediate Accounting II (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 210

Continuation of accounting theory. Examination of traditional plant assets, long-term liabilities, stockholders equity and current subjects of controversy. Emphasis on income taxes, leases, inflation accounting, cash flow statements, pension accounting, determination of earnings per share and investments.

Course Type(s):

ACT 240   Individual Income Tax Accounting (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 110

Fundamentals of federal income taxation with emphasis on individuals. Topics include determination of income, exclusions, exemptions, personal and business deductions, credits, accounting methods, and capital gains and losses. Fall

Course Type(s):

ACT 245   Cost Accounting (3)

Prerequisites: ACT 120 or ACT 130.

Focus on accountant as information gatherer and interpreter. Includes fundamental elements of production costs, budgeting, standard costs, and analysis of variances relate to interpretation and control of production costs, costing of spoilage, waste and scrap, and activity-based costing.

Course Type(s):

Agriculture - AGB

AGB 110   Agricultural Economics (4)

Prerequisites: MAT 098 or Assess into MAT 121

Characteristics of our economic system and fundamental principles of macroeconomic concepts with applications to agriculture. Effects on agriculture by money and banking systems, monetary and fiscal policies, government policies and international trade.

Course Type(s):

Agriculture - AGR

AGR 100   Agricultural Industries (1)

Introduction to industries and careers that support agriculture. Includes: Resources for major exploration (incorporating regional professional societies, guest seminars, and university transfer information). Emphasis is placed on emerging trends in field practice.

Course Type(s):

AGR 105   Sustainable Agriculture and the Environment (3)

Examines the practice of agro-ecology: the interface of management, biology and the environment in our effort to produce food, feed, and fiber for a rapidly growing human population. Consequences of historical and current practices and policies will be discussed as well as strengths and weaknesses of alternative practices that seek to employ more knowledge of biology and ecology.

Course Type(s):

AGR 110   Introductory Forestry (3)

introduction to field of forestry. In addition to traditional topics of species identification, biology and timber management, this course examines the sociological, environmental, industrial, and political influences, as well as the economic significance on domestic and international management of forest resources.

Course Type(s):

AGR 120   Precision Agriculture (3)

Emphasis on Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, data acquisition, mapping, variable rate applications and economics of precision agriculture technologies. Includes a fundamental understanding of precision agriculture; identification and use appropriate hardware and software tools; experience in developing and interpreting prescription maps; effectively use data in management decisions; and understanding of precision agriculture applications in other countries.

Course Type(s):

AGR 200   Agribusiness Internship (3)

Prerequisites: Student must have completed a minimum of 15 hours of coursework in AGR, AGB, AGS.

This internship requires students to apply their knowledge at a local agricultural business or farm.

Course Type(s):

Agriculture - AGS

AGS 170/BIO 170   Plant Science (3)

Prerequisites: High School biology or equivalent and High School Chemistry or equivalent with a grade of C or better within the last 5 years

An introduction to plant science and plant physiology spanning the areas of food, ornamental crops and sustainable agriculture.

Course Type(s):

AGS 171/BIO 171   Plant Science Lab (1)

Prerequisites: High School biology or equivalent and High School chemistry or equivalent with a grade of C or better within the last 5 years.

Corequisites: AGS 170/BIO 170

Introduction to plant science and plant physiology spanning the areas of food, ornamental crops and sustainable agriculture. Provides opportunities for laboratory application of concepts of plant science using basic research and production practices in plant science.

Course Type(s):

AGS 180/BIO 180   Animal Science (4)

Prerequisites: High School biology or equivalent and High School chemistry or equivalent with a grade of C or better within the last 5 years.

Principles of animal science including importance of animal agriculture, genetics, anatomy, physiology and nutrition.

Course Type(s):

AGS 210   Soils (3)

Prerequisites: CHM 101/103 or CHM 115 with a grade of C or better

Introduction to soil sciences with emphasis placed on physical, biological and chemical properties as related to moisture, temperature, drainage and tillage. Applications including land use, plant growth and environmental problems. Laboratory and computer methods for evaluation of the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil.

Course Type(s):

AGS 211/PHY 211   Soils Lab (1)

Prerequisites: CHM 101/103 or CHM-115 with a minimum grade of C

Laboratory and computer methods for evaluation of the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil.

Course Type(s):

Anthropology

ANT 102   Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

Study of diverse human cultures. Introduction of basic concepts and techniques practiced by cultural anthropologists. Topics include language, kinship, gender, economics, politics, ecology, and religion. Discussion of problems resulting when traditional societies confront industrial societies or industrialization.

Course Type(s):

ANT 103   Introduction to Archaeology (3)

Introduction to archaeology, with emphasis on scientific methods and procedures, tools, and techniques used by archaeologists to recover information about the past from the material remains.

Course Type(s):

ANT 105   Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)

Survey of common topics, including human evolutionary fossil record, modern physical variations such as race, forensics, and primate behavior and evolution.

Course Type(s):

ANT 151   World Archaeology (3)

Examines archaeological discoveries from prehistoric cultures and ancient civilizations of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Oceania. Exploration of human achievements from earliest human ancestors to the present to develop understanding of human condition and foundations of modern world.

Course Type(s):

ANT 161   Archaeology of Religion (3)

Study of what archaeology reveals about early religions beyond the information contained in historical texts. Material evidence provides different perspectives on the development, practice, and spread of religions around the world. Focus is on ancient Near East ? a shared backdrop for the emergence of the world religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Course Type(s):

ANT 171   Introduction to Egyptology (3)

Introduction to history, geography, society, and culture of Ancient Egypt. Special emphasis on archaeological remains. A look at how ancient Egypt foundation for the modern world has been studied and portrayed.

Course Type(s):

ANT 181   The Archaeology of Mythology (3)

Investigate what archaeology can add to the study of mythology and of the cultures that created these stories. Topics include both prehistoric and historic time periods from around the world, with a special emphasis on Classical Greece and Rome.

Course Type(s):

ANT 201   Field School in Archaeology (3-6 hrs)

Exploration of practical methods of archaeological survey and excavation needed to learn about past civilizations and cultures. Students will participate in a dig or survey project in St. Charles County or at a location such as New Mexico or Madagascar.

Course Type(s):

ANT 202   Current Debates in Anthropology (3)

Focuses on contemporary debates in anthropology (such as ? do sexually egalitarian societies exist? Did Neanderthals interbreed with modern humans? Is ethnic conflict inevitable?) from all four subdisciplines of the field. Special emphasis and discussion of current issues in cultural anthropology.

Course Type(s):

ANT 220   Middle East: People and Cultures (3)

Survey of the cultural similarities and differences among the peoples of the Near and Middle East, including historical, ethnological, and contemporary relationships.

Course Type(s):

ANT 224   People and Cultures of Africa (3)

General anthropological survey of African cultures and civilizations, past and present, throughout the continent.

Course Type(s):

ANT 290   Topics in Anthropology (3)

Exploration of topic selected by instructor. Topic varies depending on semester and instructor.

Course Type(s):

Arabic

ARB 101   Arabic Language and Culture I (4)

Basic Arabic language skills includes speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing, with emphasis on effective linguistic functioning in real situations. Explores cultures of Arabic-speaking countries.

Course Type(s):

ARB 102   Arabic Language and Culture II (4)

Prerequisites: ARB 101

Continuation of ARB 101. Explores cultures of Arabic-speaking countries.

Course Type(s):

ARB 190   Topics in Arabic Language and Culture (1-3 hrs)

Prerequisites: Dependent on topic.

Exploration of special topics and/or activities in Arabic language and culture.

Course Type(s):

ARB 201   Arabic Language and Culture III (4)

Prerequisites: ARB 102 or equivalent

Follow-up to ARB 102. Expanded opportunities for listening to, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Continued exploration of culture, with an emphasis on Arab intellectuals, poets and writers. Emphasis remains on linguistic functioning in real situations.

Course Type(s):

ARB 202   Arabic Language and Culture IV (4)

Prerequisites: ARB 201 or equivalent.

Follow-up to ARB 201. Precise and coherent use of Modern Standard Arabic language through development of the speaking, reading, writing and listening skills; more focus on syntax, morphology, and grammar. Students will take part in meaningful, functional communication that might be encountered in real life complex situations. Varied reading and writing activities representing cultural topics will be included. Media Arabic will be introduced.

Course Type(s):

Art

ART 1001   Art Appreciation (3)

Lectures to stimulate visual, emotional and intellectual awareness of humankind's artistic heritage. Covers historically significant art forms from prehistoric through postmodernism. The course will not fulfill the requirements for a major in art.

Course Type(s):

ART 1101   Mac Basics (2)

Introduction to Macintosh computer platform. Overview of computer hardware, basic factory-installed software. Macintosh operation, troubleshooting, repair, and practices. Input and output devices, such as scanners, digital cameras, video equipment and printers.

Course Type(s):

ART 1105   Digital Art Studio (3)

Focus on introducing students to digital art forms, software programs, and the interrelationship of art and technology. Students will gain experience using digital tools to create fine art & graphic communications pieces weaving technical skills into creative vision.

Course Type(s):

ART 1200   2-D Design (Design I) (3 (2))

Introduction to the basic study, use, and control of the art elements and principles of two-dimensional design that are fundamental to all visual arts through assigned problems using readings, discussion and exercises employing a variety of materials and tools. 

Course Type(s):

ART 1205   Color Theory (Design II) (3 (2))

Prerequisites: ART 1200 (ART 170)

Continue to build mastery in both use and understanding of design elements and principles with specific emphasis on the interaction and application of color in design and exploration of various color theories through a series of exercises. 

Course Type(s):

ART 1300   3-D Design (3)

Introduction to the basic study, use, and control of the art elements and principles that govern three-dimensional design and structure through assigned problems using readings, discussion and exercises designed to employ of a variety of concepts, materials and tools specific to the construction of three-dimensional art making.

Course Type(s):

ART 1400   Drawing I (3)

Introduction to drawing through variety of methods, both traditional and contemporary. Emphasis placed on analysis of space and form as well as familiarization with and control of drawing material. Introduction to line, perspective, shading, and texture.

Course Type(s):

ART 1405   Drawing II (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1400 (ART 110)

Continuation of ART 1400 (110) reassessing methods and analysis with emphasis on color theory and use of wet and dry media.

Course Type(s):

ART 1500   Survey of Western Art History I: Prehistory to End of the Middle Ages (3)

Survey art history course focusing on historically significant cultures and forms of art and architecture in Western Civilization. Exploration of the development of human achievements from Prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. 

Course Type(s):

ART 1505   Survey of Western Art History II: Renaissance to the Twentieth Century (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1001 (ART 101) or ART 1500 (ART 150)

Survey art history course focusing on historically significant cultures and forms of art and architecture in Western Civilization. Exploration of the development of human achievements from the Renaissance to the 20th century. 

Course Type(s):

ART 2100   History of Graphic Design (3)

This is a survey course on the history of Graphic Design. This course will cover the history and development of visual communication. It will begin with the development of language and will trace the evolution of word and image throughout history using the works of designers and illustrators that have influenced the continuing development of the discipline. There will be an emphasis on the influence of technology, culture, major artistic movements, and socio-political factors on the evolution of graphic design. 

Course Type(s):

ART 2110   Page Layout (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1105

Focus on page layout, publication design, and layout techniques covering a range of work, from flyers, brochures, magazines, multi-page publishing as well as electronic formats. Typography, use of space and traditional industry standards and practices included as well as prepress guidelines for both print and electronic media.

Course Type(s):

ART 2120   Typography (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1105

Focus of course will stress the refined use of typography as a design and communication tool. Students will study the history and classifications of letter-forms and use it in the creation of various typographical designs and presentations. Typical projects may range from letter and alphabet design to the use of typographical forms as the feature design elements in graphic designs or page layouts.

Course Type(s):

ART 2130   Digital Imaging & Illustration (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1105 or instructor consent

Focus on the creation and digital manipulation of artwork & images increasing familiarity with basic tools used the design. Projects focus on artwork and logo creation, image correction and adjustment, combining imagery, color correction, etc. Discussion and demonstration of traditional printing technology. Review of legal issues related to digital imagery and freelance design included.

Course Type(s):

ART 2140   Web Design (3)

Prerequisites: ART 2130 or instructor consent

Emphasis on web page design & development. Topics include the conceptualization and construction of a variety of web sites, including individual pages, HTML, email, animation, etc. Implementation of all aspects of graphic design will play a part in the overall class. This is a continuation of student design studies, applying graphic concepts to the interactive Web.

Course Type(s):

ART 2160   Motion Graphics (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1105 and ART 2130 or permission of instructor

In this class students will learn the basics of motion graphics design and animation through completion of finished projects that may include movie/tv show titles, kinetic typography, commercials, info graphics and animated shorts.

Course Type(s):

ART 2170   Video Production (3)

Prerequisites: ART 2810 (ART 221) or ART 1105 and ART 2800 (ART 220) or Instructor Consent

Course will focus on video art as an expressive media. Students will learn the basics of video production/post production through completion of finished projects that may include music videos, interview/maker videos, commercials, how to videos, comedy shorts and short form stories. Cost of course may exceed $200.

Course Type(s):

ART 2199   Portfolio Design and Professional Practices (3)

Prerequisites: instructor consent

Focus of the course will emphasize the opportunities and procedures in various fields of graphic design, illustration and the creative industries. Students will be guided in the preparation of a portfolio of their work, a resume, related documents and will learn practical interviewing techniques. The intent will be to prepare students to enter the art field with a confident and professional attitude.

Course Type(s):

ART 2210   Modern and Contemporary Art History (3)

Prerequisites: ART-1001 (ART 101) or ART-1500 (ART 150) or ART-1505 (ART 151).

Art History lecture course focusing on significant artistic developments and forms of art and architecture through exploration of the development of human achievements in the modern and contemporary era.

Course Type(s):

ART 2220   History of Photography (3)

Exploration of photography, its historical development, an examination of it as an art medium, and its influence on the development of modern art and contemporary culture.

Course Type(s):

ART 2300   Drawing III (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1405 (ART 120)

Continuation of Drawing II. Emphasis on variety of drawing materials and subject matter as well as development of individual expression.

Course Type(s):

ART 2310   Figure Drawing I (3)

Introduction to human-figure drawing through traditional and contemporary methods. Emphasis on analysis of space and form as well as human anatomy.

Course Type(s):

ART 2320   Figure Drawing II (3)

Prerequisites: ART 2310 (ART 210)

Continuation of Figure Drawing I with introduction of color theory and wet-drawing media.

Course Type(s):

ART 2330   Figure Drawing III (3)

Prerequisites: ART 2320

Studio art course that expands upon the core principles explored in Figure Drawing I and II along with broader experimentation in use of materials and deeper personal expression.

Course Type(s):

ART 2390   Special Problems in Studio Art: Drawing (3)

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor

Advanced study in studio art discipline beyond courses appearing in this catalog. Projects predetermined through interview with instructor, completed during studio times offered in discipline.

Course Type(s):

ART 2400   Painting I (3)

Prerequisites: ART 1400 (ART 110)

Studio course where students work with oil paints to realistically represent subject matter in the tradition of Western Art and participate in critique sessions. Paint density, texture and chemistry will be discussed. The formal aspects of drawing will be applied. Painting demonstrations are designed to help each student understand the objective of the assignments. Students will prepare their own painting surfaces in order to learn and appreciate the craft involved with the entire process of creating a finished work of art.

Course Type(s):

ART 2401   Painting for Non-Art Majors (3)

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